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Reports & Insight

UBS study of women investors reveals the “divide and conquer” approach

As women’s life expectancies increase and divorce rates remain high, more women may find themselves solely responsible for their own finances. UBS Global Wealth Management embarked on research to gauge women’s level of and satisfaction with their financial involvement. From September 2017 to January 2019, UBS surveyed 3,652 women. Of these women, 2,251 were married with at least $1m in investable assets. Others (1,401) were either divorced or widowed. These women had at least $250k in investable assets. UBS also conducted in-depth interviews with 71 female respondents. The entire global sample was split across nine markets: Brazil, Germany, Hong Kong, Mexico, Singapore, Switzerland, Italy, the UK and the US.

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Jen Coy
Masters of Scale: The persistence of the “gender investing gap”

In addition to facing inequality in pay, women are also lagging behind when it comes to investing. In the latest episode of the Masters of Scale podcast, Ellevest CEO Sallie Krawcheck talks about the cost this disparity in financing has on women’s lives. Why it matters: With women earning only 50% of what men earn, the “gender investing gap,” as Krawcheck calls it, further exacerbates the wealth divide among genders, making it even harder for women to make independent financial decisions.

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Jen Coy
Creating a More Human Workplace Where Employees and Business Thrive

For many employees, the current state of the workplace is depleting, dispiriting and stressful. “Doing more with less” often means demands are exceeding capacity, draining people of the energy needed to fulfill their potential. Technology links us 24/7 to a flood of information, and Americans are spending more and more hours working with little downtime. How do HR professionals change this picture?

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Jen Coy
Competitive advantage with a human dimension: From lifelong learning to lifelong employability

As AI-enabled automation advances, organizations should embrace “lifelong employability,” which stretches traditional notions of learning and development and can inspire workers to adapt to the evolving economy. Lifelong employability offers a way to meet the challenges of an evolving workforce with a sense of aspiration and hope, rather than patchwork solutions. By changing how they think about L&D, senior executives can get ahead of the challenge and start making a better workplace for everyone.

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Jen Coy